89 Remarkable Abe Lincoln Quotes

89 Remarkable Abe Lincoln Quotes

by / Comments Off / 57 View / Jan 5, 2015

Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States from 1861 to 1865. He is most known for signing the Emancipation Proclamation which abolished slavery in America. Also during his term he led the north to victory in the Civil War. He was assassinated while watching a play on April 15, 1865.

“Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing.”

“Any people anywhere being inclined and having the power have the right to rise up and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better.”

“As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this, to the extent of the difference, is no democracy.”

“At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must
ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide.”

“Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.”

“Beware of rashness, but with energy and sleepless vigilance go forward and give us victories.”

“Both parties deprecated war; but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive; and the other would accept war rather than let it perish. And the war came.”

“Determine that the thing can and shall be done, and then we shall find the way.”

“Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can. Point out to them how the nominal winner is often a real loser — in fees, expenses, and waste of time.”

“Don’t interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties. And not to Democrats alone do I make this appeal, but to all who
love these great and true principles.”

“Every man is proud of what he does well; and no man is proud of what he does not do well. With the former, his heart is in his work; and he will do twice as much of it with less fatigue.
The latter performs a little imperfectly, looks at it in disgust, turns from it, and imagines himself exceedingly tired. The little he has done, comes to nothing, for want of finishing.”

“Every man is said to have his peculiar ambition. Whether it be true or not, I can say, for one, that I have no other so great as that of being truly esteemed of my fellow-men, by rendering
myself worthy of their esteem.”

“Folks are usually about as happy as they make their minds up to be.”

from the force of circumstances, the basest principles of our nature, were either made to lie dormant, or to become the active agents in the advancement of the noblest cause — that of
establishing and maintaining civil and religious liberty. But this state of feeling must fade, is fading, has faded, with the circumstances that produced it.”

“He can compress the most words into the smallest ideas of any man I ever met.”

“Human action can be modified to some extent, but human nature cannot be changed. There is a judgment and a feeling against slavery in this nation.”

“I am approached with the most opposite opinions and advice, and that by religious men, who are equally certain that they represent the Divine will. I am sure that either the one or the
other class is mistaken in that belief, and perhaps in some respects both.”

“I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate and aid this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our National Union, and the perpetuity of popular
government; and to redress wrongs already long enough endured.”

“I believe, if we take habitual drunkards as a class, their heads and their hearts will bear an advantageous comparison with those of any other class. There seems ever to have been a
proneness in the brilliant and warm-blooded to fall into this vice.”

“I cannot bring myself to believe that any human being lives who would do me any harm.”

“I do further proclaim, declare, and make known that any provision which may be adopted by such State government in relation to the freed people of such State, which shall recognize and
declare their permanent freedom, provide for their education, and which may yet be consistent, as a temporary arrangement, with their present condition as a laboring, landless, and homeless
class, will not be objected to by the national Executive.”

“I do not like that man. I must get to know him better.”

“I don’t know who my grandfather was; I am much more concerned to know what his grandson will be.”

“I don’t think much of a man who is not wiser than he was yesterday.”

“I freely acknowledge myself the servant of the people, according to the bond of service—the United States constitution; and that, as such, I am responsible to them.”

“I have always found that mercy bears richer fruits than strict justice.”

“I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go. My own wisdom and that of all about me seemed insufficient for that day.”

“I have never had a feeling politically that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence.”

“I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the states where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination
to do so.”

“I insist, that if there is ANY THING which it is the duty of the WHOLE PEOPLE to never entrust to any hands but their own, that thing is the preservation and perpetuity, of their own
liberties, and institutions.”

“I never had a policy; I have just tried to do my very best each and every day.”

“I suppose you are going home to see your families and friends. For the service you have done in this great struggle in which we are engaged I present you sincere thanks for myself and the

“I want it said of me by those who knew me best that I always plucked a thistle and planted a flower where I thought a flower would grow.”

“I will prepare and some day my chance will come.”

“If by the mere force of numbers a majority should deprive a minority of any clearly written constitutional right, it might, in a moral point of view, justify revolution—certainly would if
such a right were a vital one.”

“If once you forfeit the confidence of your fellow-citizens, you can never regain their respect and esteem.”

“If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could then better judge what to do, and how to do it. ”

“If what I feel were equally distributed to the whole human family, there would not be one cheerful face on the earth.”

“In some respects she certainly is not my equal; but in her natural right to eat the bread she earns with her own hands without asking leave of any one else, she is my equal, and the equal
of all others.”

“In those days, as I understand, masters could, at their own pleasure, emancipate their slaves; but since then, such legal restraints have been made upon emancipation, as to amount almost to

“It has been my experience that folks who have no vices have very few virtues.”

“It has long been a grave question whether any government, not too strong for the liberties of its people, can be strong enough to maintain its existence in great emergencies.”

“It is difficult to make a man miserable while he feels worthy of himself and claims kindred to the great God who made him.”

“It is to deny, what the history of the world tells us is true, to suppose that men of ambition and talents will not continue to spring up amongst us. And, when they do, they will as
naturally seek the gratification of their ruling passion, as others have so done before them.

“It was not best to swap horses when crossing streams.”

“It’s my experience that folks who have no vices have generally very few virtues.”

“Let every American, every lover of liberty, every well-wisher to his posterity swear by the blood of the Revolution never to violate in the least particular the laws of the country, and
never to tolerate their violation by others.”

“Let north and south—let all Americans—let all lovers of liberty everywhere—join in the great and good work. If we do this, we shall not only have saved the Union; but we shall have so saved
it, as to make, and to keep it, forever worthy of the saving. We shall have so saved it, that the succeeding millions of free happy people, the world over, shall rise up, and call us
blessed, to the latest generations.”

“Let us discard all this quibbling about this man and the other man, this race and that race and the other race being inferior and therefore they must be placed in an inferior position. Let
us discard all these things, and unite as one people throughout this land, until we shall once more stand up declaring that all men are created equal.”

“May our children and our children’s children to a thousand generations, continue to enjoy the benefits conferred upon us by a united country, and have cause yet to rejoice under those
glorious institutions bequeathed us by Washington and his compeers.”

“Men are not flattered by being shown that there has been a difference of purpose between the Almighty and them.”

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.”

“No country can sustain, in idleness, more than a small percentage of its numbers. The great majority must labor at something productive.”

“No man is good enough to govern another man without the other’s consent.”

“No, leave it as a monument.”

“Perhaps a man’s character was like a tree, and his reputation like its shadow; the shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.”

“Reduce the supply of black labor by colonizing the black laborer out of the country, and by precisely so much you increase the demand for and wages of white labor.”

“Senator Douglas holds, we know, that a man may rightfully be wiser today than he was yesterday — that he may rightfully change when he finds himself wrong. But can we, for that reason, run
ahead, and infer that he will make any particular change, of which he, himself, has given no intimation?”

“Slavery is wrong. If Slavery is right, all words, acts, laws, and Constitutions against it, are themselves wrong, and should be silenced, and swept away.”

“Soldiers — You are about to return to your homes and your friends, after having, as I learn, performed in camp a comparatively short term of duty in this great contest. I am greatly obliged
to you, and to all who have come forward at the call of their country.”

“That is the electric cord in that Declaration that links the hearts of patriotic and liberty-loving men together, that will link those patriotic hearts as long as the love of freedom exists
in the minds of men throughout the world.”

“The better part of one’s life consists of his friendships.”

“The foregoing history may not be precisely accurate in every particular; but I am sure it is sufficiently so, for all the uses I shall attempt to make of it, and in it, we have before us,
the chief material enabling us to correctly judge whether the repeal of the Missouri Compromise is right or wrong.”

“The legitimate object of government, is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but can not do, at all, or can not, so well do, for themselves – in their separate,
and individual capacities. In all that the people can individually do as well for themselves, government ought not to interfere.”

“The master not only governs the slave without his consent, but he governs him by a set of rules altogether different from those which he prescribes for himself. Allow ALL the governed an
equal voice in the government, and that, and that only, is self-government.”

“The people of these United States are the rightful masters of both Congresses and courts, not to overthrow the Constitution, but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.”

“The people themselves, and not their servants, can safely reverse their own deliberate decisions.”

“The purposes of the Almighty are perfect, and must prevail, though we erring mortals may fail to accurately perceive them in advance.”

“The severest justice may not always be the best policy.”

“The struggle of today, is not altogether for today — it is for a vast future also. With a reliance on Providence, all the more firm and earnest, let us proceed in the great task which
events have devolved upon us.”

“The true rule, in determining to embrace, or reject any thing, is not whether it have any evil in it; but whether it have more of evil, than of good.”

“The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone
to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually
insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God.”

this is the leading principle, the sheet-anchor of American republicanism.”

“Truth is generally the best vindication against slander.”

“Understanding the spirit of our institutions to aim at the elevation of men, I am opposed to whatever tends to degrade them.”

“We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every
battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better
angels of our nature.”

“We find a race of men living in that day whom we claim as our fathers and grandfathers; they were iron men; they fought for the principle that they were contending for; and we understood
that by what they then did it has followed that the degree of prosperity which we now enjoy has come to us.”

“We hope all danger may be overcome; but to conclude that no danger may ever arise would itself be extremely dangerous.”

“We shall lie down pleasantly dreaming that the people of Missouri are on the verge of making their State free, and we shall awake to the reality instead, that the Supreme Court has made
Illinois a slave State. ”

“We shall not fail — if we stand firm, we shall not fail. Wise counsels may accelerate, or mistakes delay it, but, sooner or later, the victory is sure to come.”

“We should be too big to take offense and too noble to give it.”

“What constitutes the bulwark of our own liberty and independence?”

“When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. That’s my religion.”

“When Southern people tell us they are no more responsible for the origin of slavery than we are, I acknowledge the fact.”

“Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better or equal hope in the world?”

“With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed. Consequently he who moulds public sentiment, goes deeper than he who enacts statutes or pronounces decisions. He
makes statutes and decisions possible or impossible to be executed.”

“You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.”

“You enquire where I now stand. That is a disputed point.”