34 Best Margaret Atwood Quotes

34 Best Margaret Atwood Quotes

by / Comments Off / 98 View / Jan 7, 2015

Margaret Atwood is a activist, novelist, and literature critic from Ottawa, Canada. She is most known for her book of short stories called Tamarack Review. She won the Arthur C. Clarke Award for her work. She still lives in Canada and continues to write.

“A voice is a human gift; it should be cherished and used, to utter fully human speech as possible. Powerlessness and silence go together.”

“After a year or two of keeping my head down and trying to pass myself off as a normal person, I made contact with the five other people at my university who were interested in writing; and
through them, and some of my teachers, I discovered that there was a whole subterranean Wonderland of Canadian writing that was going on just out of general earshot and sight.”

“All stories are about wolves. All worth repeating, that is. Anything else is sentimental drivel. ”

“An eye for an eye only leads to more blindness.”

“Another belief of mine; that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise.”

“As for my birth month, a detail of much interest to poets, obsessed as they are with symbolic systems of all kinds: I was not pleased, during my childhood, to have been born in November, as
there wasn’t much inspiration for birthday party motifs. February children got hearts, May ones flowers, but what was there for me? A cake surrounded by withered leaves? November was a drab,
dark and wet month, lacking even snow; its only noteworthy festival was Remembrance Day. But in adult life I discovered that November was, astrologically speaking, the month of sex, death
and regeneration, and that November First was the Day of the Dead. It still wouldn’t have been much good for birthday parties, but it was just fine for poetry, which tends to revolve a good
deal around sex and death, with regeneration optional.”

“Canada is a balloon-puncturing country. You are not really allowed to be an icon unless you also make an idiot of yourself.”

“Canada was built on dead beavers.”

“Does feminist mean large unpleasant person who’ll shout at you or someone who believes women are human beings. To me it’s the latter, so I sign up.”

“He had that faint sick look in his eyes, as if he wanted to give her something, charity for instance.”

“I can tell you that once upon a time when I was doing public events people would ask me, “What do you think about the arts?, What do you think of the role of women?, What do you think of
men?, What do you think of all of these things?”, and now they ask one thing, and that one thing is this, “Is there hope?”.”

“I hope that people will finally come to realize that there is only one ‘race’ – the human race – and that we are all members of it.”

“I no longer feel I’ll be dead by thirty; now it’s sixty. I suppose these deadlines we set for ourselves are really a way of saying we appreciate time, and want to use all of it. I’m still
writing, I’m still writing poetry, I still can’t explain why, and I’m still running out of time.”

“I would rather dance as a ballerina, though faultily, than as a flawless clown.”

“If I were going to convert to any religion I would probably choose Catholicism because it at least has female saints and the Virgin Mary.”

“If the national mental illness of the United States is megalomania, that of Canada is paranoid schizophrenia.”

“If you’re put on a pedestal, you’re supposed to behave yourself like a pedestal type of person. Pedestals actually have a limited circumference. Not much room to move around.”

“I’ll take care of it, Luke said. And because he said it instead of her, I knew he meant kill. That is what you have to do before you kill, I thought. You have to create an it, where none
was before. You do that first, in your head, and then you make it real.”

“It’s a feature of our age that if you write a work of fiction, everyone assumes that the people and events in it are disguised biography — but if you write your biography, it’s equally
assumed you’re lying your head off. This last may be true, at any rate of poets: Plato said that poets should be excluded from the ideal republic because they are such liars. I am a poet,
and I affirm that this is true. About no subject are poets tempted to lie so much as about their own lives; I know one of them who has floated at least five versions of his autobiography,
none of them true. I of course — being also a novelist — am a much more truthful person than that. But since poets lie, how can you believe me?”

“I’ve never understood why people consider youth a time of freedom and joy. It’s probably because they have forgotten their own.”

“Like all twenty-one-year-old poets, I thought I would be dead by thirty, and Sylvia Plath had not set a helpful example. For a while there, you were made to feel that, if a poet and female,
you could not really be serious about it unless you’d made a least one suicide attempt. So I felt I was running out of time.”

“Never pray for justice, because you might get some.”

“Popular art is the dream of society; it does not examine itself.”

“Sanity is a valuable possession; I hoard it the way people once hoarded money. I save it, so I will have enough, when the time comes.”

“The answers you get from literature depend on the questions you pose.”

“The Eskimo has fifty-two names for snow because it is important to them; there ought to be as many for love.”

“The policemen’s faces glisten too, they’re holding themselves back, they love this, it’s a ceremony, they’re implementing a policy.”

“The sitting room is subdued, symmetrical; it’s one of the shapes money takes when it freezes.”

“There is more than one kind of freedom, said Aunt Lydia. Freedom to and freedom from. In the days of anarchy, it was freedom to. Now you are being given freedom from. Don’t underrate it.”

“They all disowned their parents long ago, the way you are supposed to.”

time is compressed like the fist I close on my knee. . . . I hold inside it the clues and solutions and the power for what I must do now.”

“War is what happens when language fails.”

“We still think of a powerful man as a born leader and a powerful woman as an anomaly.”

“When I was sixteen, it was simple. Poetry existed; therefore it could be written; and nobody had told me — yet — the many, many reasons why it could not be written by me.”