33 Incredible Washington Irving Quotes

33 Incredible Washington Irving Quotes

by / Comments Off / 51 View / Dec 23, 2014

Washington Irving was an author, historian, and diplomat from New York City. He is most famous for his short story The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow which was published in 1820. Along with his writing career he served as the U.S. ambassador to Spain. He died in 1859 at the age of 76.

“A kind heart is a fountain of gladness, making everything in its vicinity freshen into smiles.”

“A tart temper never mellows with age, and a sharp tongue is the only edge tool that grows keener with constant use.”

“A woman’s whole life is a history of the affections. The heart is her world: it is there her ambition strives for empire; it is there her avarice seeks for hidden treasures. She sends forth
her sympathies on adventure; she embarks her whole soul on the traffic of affection; and if shipwrecked, her case is hopeless — for it is a bankruptcy of the heart.”

“Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.”

“Great minds have purposes, others have wishes. Little minds are tamed and subdued by misfortune; but great minds rise above them.”

“His military triumphs awakened no pride nor vain glory, as they would have done had they been effected for selfish purposes. In the time of his greatest power he maintained the same
simplicity of manners and appearance as in the days of his adversity. So far from affecting a regal state, he was displeased if, on entering a room, any unusual testimonials of respect were
shown to him. If he aimed at a universal dominion, it was the dominion of faith; as to the temporal rule which grew up in his hands, as he used it without ostentation, so he took no step to
perpetuate it in his family”

“How convenient it would be to many of our great men and great families of doubtful origin, could they have the privilege of the heroes of yore, who, whenever their origin was involved in
obscurity, modestly announced themselves descended from a god.”

“In his private dealings he was just. He treated friends and strangers, the rich and poor, the powerful and weak, with equity, and was beloved by the common people for the affability with
which he received them, and listened to their complaints.[...]”

“Language gradually varies, and with it fade away the writings of authors who have flourished their allotted time; otherwise, the creative powers of genius would overstock the world, and the
mind would be completely bewildered in the endless mazes of literature.”

“Little minds are tamed and subdued by misfortune; but great minds rise above them.”

“Love is never lost. If not reciprocated, it will flow back and soften and purify the heart.”

“Other men are known to posterity only through the medium of history, which is continually growing faint and obscure; but the intercourse between the author and his fellow-men is ever new,
active, and immediate.”

“Poetry had breathed over and sanctified the land.”

“Rising genius always shoots out its rays from among the clouds, but these will gradually roll away and disappear as it ascends to its steady luster.”

“Surely happiness is reflective, like the light of heaven; and every countenance, bright with smiles, and glowing with innocent enjoyment, is a mirror transmitting to others the rays of a
supreme and ever-shining benevolence.”

“Sweet is the memory of distant friends! Like the mellow rays of the departing sun, it falls tenderly, yet sadly, on the heart.”

“That happy age when a man can be idle with impunity.”

“The great British Library — an immense collection of volumes of all ages and languages, many of which are now forgotten, and most of which are seldom read: one of these sequestered pools of
obsolete literature to which modern authors repair, and draw buckets full of classic lore, or “pure English, undefiled” wherewith to swell their own scanty rills of thought.”

“The only happy author in this world is he who is below the care of reputation.”

“The tie which links mother and child is of such pure and immaculate strength as to be never violated.”

“The tongue is the only tool that gets sharper with use.”

“There is a certain relief in change, even though it be from bad to worse! As I have often found in travelling in a stagecoach, that it is often a comfort to shift one’s position, and be
bruised in a new place.”

“There is a sacredness in tears. They are the messengers of overwhelming grief, of deep contrition, and of unspeakable love.”

“There is an eloquence in true enthusiasm that is not to be doubted.”

“There is in every true woman’s heart, a spark of heavenly fire, which lies dormant in the broad daylight of prosperity, but which kindles up and beams and blazes in the dark hour of

“There rise authors now and then, who seem proof against the mutability of language, because they have rooted themselves in the unchanging principles of human nature.”

“They are given to all kinds of marvellous beliefs; are subject to rances and visions; and frequently see strange sights, and hear music and voices in the air.”

“They claim to be the first inventors of those recondite beverages, cocktail, stonefence, and sherry cobbler.”

“Those men are most apt to be obsequious and conciliating abroad, who are under the discipline of shrews at home.”

“To look upon its grass grown yard, where the sunbeams seem to sleep so quietly, one would think that there at least the dead might rest in peace.”

“Whenever a man’s friends begin to compliment him about looking young, he may be sure that they think he is growing old.”