31 Greatest Rachel Carson Quotes

31 Greatest Rachel Carson Quotes

by / Comments Off / 241 View / Dec 23, 2014

Rachel Carson was a marine biologist and author from Pennsylvania. She is most famous for his book Silent Spring, which is credited to the advancment of the global environment movement. She died on April 14, 1964 at the age of 56.

“A child’s world is fresh and new and beautiful, full or wonder and excitement. It is our misfortune that for most of us that clear-eyed vision, that true instinct for what is beautiful and
awe-inspiring, is dimmed and even lost before we reach adulthood. If I had influence with the good fairy who is supposed to preside over the christening of all children, I should ask that
her gift to each child in the world be a sense of wonder so indestructible that it would last throughout life, as an unfailing antidote against the boredom and disenchantment of later year…
the alienation from the sources of our strength.”

“Any concept of biology is not only sterile and profitless, it is distorted and untrue, if it puts its primary focus on unnatural conditions rather than on those vast forces not of man’s
making that shape and channel the nature and direction of life.”

“As crude a weapon as the cave man’s club, the chemical barrage has been hurled against the fabric of life.”

“But man is a part of nature, and his war against nature is inevitably a war against himself.”

“For the sense of smell, almost more than any other, has the power to recall memories and it’s a pity we use it so little.”

“I like to define biology as the history of the earth and all its life — past, present, and future.”

“I sincerely believe that for the child, and for the parent seeking to guide him, it is not half so important to know as to feel.”

“If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder without any such gift from the fairies, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the
joy, excitement and mystery of the world we live in.”

“If there is poetry in my book about the sea, it is not because I deliberately put it there, but because no one could write truthfully about the sea and leave out the poetry.”

“In an age when man has forgotten his origins and is blind even to his most essential needs for survival, water along with other resources has become the victim of his indifference.”

“In every outthrust headland, in every curving beach, in every grain of sand there is the story of the earth.”

“In nature nothing exists alone.”

“It is a wholesome and necessary thing for us to turn again to the earth and in the contemplation of her beauties to know of wonder and humility.”

“It is not half so important to know as to feel. ”

“Once the emotions have been aroused — a sense of the beautiful, the excitement of the new and the unknown, a feeling of sympathy, pity, admiration or love — then we wish for knowledge about
the subject of our emotional response. Once found, it has lasting meaning. It is more important to pave the way for the child to want to know than to put him on a diet of facts he is not
ready to assimilate.”

“One way to open your eyes is to ask yourself, ‘What if I had never seen this before? What if I knew I would never see it again?’”

“Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species — man — acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.”

“The aim of science is to discover and illuminate truth. And that, I take it, is the aim of literature, whether biography or history or fiction. It seems to me, then, that there can be no
separate literature of science.”

“The control of nature is a phrase conceived in arrogance, born of the Neanderthal age of biology and the convenience of man. ”

“The discipline of the writer is to learn to be still and listen to what his subject has to tell him.”

“The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place.”

“The human race is challenged more than ever before to demonstrate our mastery, not over nature but of ourselves.”

“The more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us, the less taste we shall have for destruction.”

“The most alarming of all man’s assaults upon the environment is the contamination of air, earth, rivers, and sea with dangerous and even lethal materials.”

“The question is whether any civilization can wage relentless war on life without destroying itself, and without losing the right to be called civilized.”

“The real wealth of the Nation lies in the resources of the earth — soil, water, forests, minerals, and wildlife.”

“This is an era of specialists, each of whom sees his own problem and is unaware of or intolerant of the larger frame into which it fits.”

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find resources of strength that will endure as long as life lasts.”

“Those who dwell, as scientists or laymen, among the beauties and mysteries of the earth, are never alone or weary of life.”

“To stand at the edge of the sea, to sense the ebb and flow of the tides, to feel the breath of a mist moving over a great salt marsh, to watch the flight of shore birds that have swept up
and down the surf lines of the continents for untold thousands of year, to see the running of the old eels and the young shad to the sea, is to have knowledge of things that are as nearly
eternal as any earthly life can be. ”

“We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the roads in Robert Frost’s familiar poem, they are not equally fair.”