30 Incredible Maria Montessori

30 Incredible Maria Montessori

by / Comments Off / 115 View / Nov 24, 2014

Maria Montessori was a educator and physician from Italy that is most famous for her philosophy of education for children. She developed a method of education that is still widely used around the world. She died in 1952 at the age of 81.

“A child in his earliest years, when he is only two or a little more, is capable of tremendous achievements simply through his unconscious power of absorption, though he is himself still immobile. After the age of three he is able to acquire a great number of concepts through his own efforts in exploring his surroundings. In this period he lays hold of things through his own activity and assimilates them into his mind.”

“An educational method that shall have liberty as its basis must intervene to help the child to a conquest of liberty. That is to say, his training must be such as shall help him to diminish as much as possible the social bonds which limit his activity.”

“Children are human beings to whom respect is due, superior to us by reason of their innocence and of the greater possibilities of their future.”

“Do not erase the designs the child makes in the soft wax of his inner life.”

“Education today, in this particular social period, is assuming truly unlimited importance. And the increased emphasis on its practical value can be summed up in one sentence: education is the best weapon for peace.”

“Establishing lasting peace is the work of education; all politics can do is keep us out of war.”

“Free the child’s potential, and you will transform him into the world.”

“Great tact and delicacy is necessary for the care of the mind of a child from three to six years, and an adult can have very little of it.”

“If help and salvation are to come, they can only come from the children, for the children are the makers of men.”

“It is the child who makes the man, and no man exists who was not made by the child he once was.”

“Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed.”

“Of all things love is the most potent.”

“One test of the correctness of educational procedure is the happiness of the child.”

“Our care of the child should be governed, not by the desire to make him learn things, but by the endeavor always to keep burning within him that light which is called intelligence.”

“Plainly, the environment must be a living one, directed by a higher intelligence, arranged by an adult who is prepared for his mission.”

“Since it has been seen to be necessary to give so much to the child, let us give him a vision of the whole universe. The universe is an imposing reality and an answer to all questions. We
shall walk together on this path of life, for all things are part of the universe and are connected with each other to form one whole unity. This idea helps the mind of the child to become fixed, to stop wandering in an aimless quest for knowledge. He is satisfied, having found the universal centre of himself with all things.”

“The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind.”

“The environment must be rich in motives which lend interest to activity and invite the child to conduct his own experiences.”

“The first essential for the child’s development is concentration. The child who concentrates is immensely happy.”

“The first idea the child must acquire is that of the difference between good and evil.”

“The only language men ever speak perfectly is the one they learn in babyhood, when no one can teach them anything!”

“The task of the educator lies in seeing that the child does not confound good with immobility and evil with activity.”

“The teacher must derive not only the capacity, but the desire, to observe natural phenomena. The teacher must understand and feel her position of observer: the activity must lie in the phenomenon.”

“To aid life, leaving it free, however, that is the basic task of the educator.”

“Today, however, those things which occupy us in the field of education are the interests of humanity at large and of civilization, and before such great forces we can recognize only one country—the entire world.”

“We cannot create observers by saying “observe,” but by giving them the power and the means for this observation and these means are procured through education of the senses.”

“We discovered that education is not something which the teacher does, but that it is a natural process which develops spontaneously in the human being.”

“We especially need imagination in science. It is not all mathematics, nor all logic, but it is somewhat beauty and poetry.”

“We teachers can only help the work going on, as servants wait upon a master.”

“Within the child lies the fate of the future.”