29 Most Famous Jackson Pollock Quotes

29 Most Famous Jackson Pollock Quotes

by / Comments Off / 1527 View / Dec 15, 2014

Jackson Pollock was a painter and expressionist from Wyoming. He is most famous for his unique style, now known as drip painting. Pollock struggled with alcoholism for the majority of his life and on August 11, 1956 he died in an alcohol related car accident at the age of 44.

“Abstract painting is abstract. It confronts you. There was a reviewer a while back who wrote that my pictures didn’t have any beginning or any end. He didn’t mean it as a compliment, but it
was.”

“As to what I would like to be. It is difficult to say. An Artist of some kind. If nothing else I shall always study the Arts. People have always frightened and bored me consequently I have
been within my own shell and have not accomplished anything materially.”

“Each age finds its own technique… I mean, the strangeness will wear off and I think we will discover the deeper meanings in modern art.”

“Energy and motion made visible – memories arrested in space.”

“Every good painter paints what he is.”

“He has broken the ice.”

“I’ve had a period of drawing on canvas in black – with some of my early images coming thru -, think the non-objectivists will find them disturbing – and the kids who think it simple to
splash a ‘Pollock’ out.”

“I’m very representational some of the time, and a little all of the time. But when you’re painting out of your unconscious, figures are bound to emerge.”

“It [abstract art] should be enjoyed just as music is enjoyed – after a while you may like it or you may not.”

“It came into existence because I had to paint it. Any attempt on my part to say something about it, to attempt explanation of the inexplicable, could only destroy it.”

“It doesn’t make much difference how the paint is put on as long as something has been said. Technique is just a means of arriving at a statement.”

“Love is friendship set to music.”

“Modern art to me is nothing more than the expression of contemporary aims of the age we’re living in… All cultures have had means and techniques of expressing their immediate aims – the
Chinese, the Renaissance, all cultures. The thing that interests me is that today painters do not have to go to a subject matter outside of themselves. Most modern painters work from a
different source, they work from within.”

“Most of the paint I use is a liquid, flowing kind of paint. The brushes I use are more a sticks rather than brushes – the brush doesn’t touch the surface on the canvas, it’s just above…
[so] I am able to be more free and to have greater freedom and move about the canvas, with greater ease.”

“My concern is with the rhythms of nature… I work inside out, like nature.”

“My work with Benton was important as something against which to react very strongly, later on; in this, it was better to have worked with him than with a less resistant personality who
would have provided a much less strong opposition. At the same time Benton introduced me to Renaissance art. (on his former teacher Benton)”

“Naturally, the result is the thing (in painting, fh) and it doesn’t make much difference how the paint is put on as long as something has been said. Technique is just a means of arriving at
a statement.”

“No chaos, damn it.”

“Painting is self-discovery. Every good artist paints what he is.”

“The important thing is that Clyff Still – you know his work? – and Rothko, and I – we’ve changed the nature of painting… I don’t mean there aren’t any other good painters. Bill is a good
painter, but he’s a “French” painter. I told him so, the last time I saw him after his last show… all those pictures in his last show start with an image. You can see it even though he’s
covered it up, or tried to… Style – that’s the French part of it. He has to cover it up with style..”

“The modern artist is working with space and time, and expressing his feelings rather than illustrating.”

“The modern artist…is working and expressing an inner world – in other words – expressing the energy, the motion, and other inner forces.”

“The painter locks himself out of his own studio. And then has to break in like a thief.”

“There was a reviewer a while back who wrote that my pictures didn’t have any beginning or any end. He didn’t meant it as a compliment, but it was. It was a fine compliment. Only he didn’t
know it.”

“Today painters do not have to go to a subject matter outside of themselves. Most modern painters work from a different source. They work from within.”

“Well, method is, it seems to me, a natural growth out of a need, and from a need the modern artist has found new ways of expressing the world about him. I happen to find ways that are
different from the usual techniques, which seems a little strange at the moment, but I don’t think there’s anything very different about it. I paint on the floor and this isn’t unusual – the
Orientals did that.”

“When I am in my painting, I am not aware of what I’m doing. It is only after a short of ‘get acquainted’ period that I see what I have been about. I have no fears about making changes,
destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through. It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise
there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.”

“With experience it seems to be possible to control the flow of paint, to a great extent, and I don’t use – I don’t use the accident – ‘cause I deny the accident… it’s quite different from
working, say, from a still life where you set up objects and work directly from them. I do have a general notion of what I’m about and what the results will be. I approach painting in the
same sense as one approaches drawing, that is, it’s direct.”