24 Incredible William Wilberforce Quotes

24 Incredible William Wilberforce Quotes

by / Comments Off / 385 View / Nov 18, 2014

William Wilberforce was a politician and philanthropist from England. He was one of the strongest leaders in the abolishment of slavery. He bought his way into parliament at the young age of 21. He died in 1833 from a fight with the flu.

“Accepting the position of leader of the anti-slavery campaign.”

“Accustom yourself to look first to the dreadful consequences of failure; then fix your eye on the glorious prize which is before you; and when your strength begins to fail, and your spirits are well nigh exhausted, let the animating view rekindle your resolution, and call forth in renewed vigour the fainting energies of your soul.”

“As much pains were taken to make me idle as were ever taken to make me studious.”

“Can one serve God and one’s nation in parliament?”

“Can you tell a plain man the road to heaven? Certainly, turn at once to the right, then go straight forward.”

“God Almighty has set before me two Great Objects: the supression of the Slave Trade and the Reformation of Manners.”

“How can we judge fairly of the characters and merits of men, of the wisdom or folly of actions, unless we have . . . an accurate knowledge of all particulars, so that we may live as it were in the times, and among the persons, of whom we read, see with their eyes, and reason and decide on their premises?”

“If to be feelingly alive to the sufferings of my fellow-creatures is to be a fanatic, I am one of the most incurable fanatics ever permitted to be at large.”

“It is the true duty of every man to promote the happiness of his fellow creatures to the utmost of his power.”

“Let everyone regulate his conduct . . . by the golden rule of doing to others as in similar circumstances we would have them do to us, and the path of duty will be clear before him.”

“Let true Christians then, with becoming earnestness, strive in all things to recommend their profession, and to put to silence the vain scoffs of ignorant objectors.”

“Life as we know it, with all its ups and downs, will soon be over. We all will give an accounting to God of how we have lived.”

“My walk is a public one. My business is in the world, and I must mix in the assemblies of men or quit the post which Providence seems to have assigned me.”

“Of all things, guard against neglecting God in the secret place of prayer.”

“So enormous, so dreadful, so irremediable did the Trade’s wickedness appear that my own mind was completely made up for Abolition. Let the consequences be what they would, I from this time determined that I would never rest until I had effected its abolition.”

“Surely the principles of Christianity lead to action as well as meditation.”

“The distemper of which, as a community, we are sick, should be considered rather as a moral than a political malady.”

“The first years in Parliament I did nothing – nothing to any purpose. My own distinction was my darling object.”

“The objects of the present life fill the human eye with a false magnification because of their immediacy.”

“This perpetual hurry of business and company ruins me in soul if not in body. More solitude and earlier hours!”

“We are too young to realize that certain things are impossible… So we will do them anyway.”

“We can scarcely indeed look into any part of the sacred volume without meeting abundant proofs, that it is the religion of the Affections which God particularly requires. Love, Zeal,
Gratitude, Joy, Hope, Trust, are each of them specified; and are not allowed to us as weaknesses, but enjoined on us as our bounden duty, and commended to us as our acceptable worship.”

“What should we suppose must naturally be the consequence of our carrying on a slave trade with Africa? With a country, vast in its extent, not utterly barbarous, but civilized in a very small degree? Does any one suppose a slave trade would help their civilization?”

“You may choose to look the other way but you can never say again that you did not know.”