24 Famous Jane Goodall Quotes

24 Famous Jane Goodall Quotes

by / Comments Off / 123 View / Dec 15, 2014

Jane Goodall is a anthropologist and primatologist from the United Kingdom. She is considered the world’s most experienced expert on chimpanzees. She has studied them and their social interactions for over 50 years in Gombe Stream national Park. She also serves on the board of Nonhuman Rights Project.

“Anyone who tries to improve the lives of animals invariably comes in for criticism from those who believe such efforts are misplaced in a world of suffering humanity.”

“Chimps are very quick to have a sudden fight or aggressive episode, but they’re equally as good at reconciliation.”

“Especially now when views are becoming more polarized, we must work to understand each other across political, religious and national boundaries.”

“Every individual matters. Every individual has a role to play. Every individual makes a difference.”

“I do not want to discuss evolution in such depth, however, only touch on it from my own perspective: from the moment when I stood on the Serengeti plains holding the fossilized bones of
ancient creatures in my hands to the moment when, staring into the eyes of a chimpanzee, I saw a thinking, reasoning personality looking back. You may not believe in evolution, and that is
all right. How we humans came to be the way we are is far less important than how we should act now to get out of the mess we have made for ourselves.”

“I don’t spend that much time being introspective, believe it or not. All I know is that I grew up not questioning God because that’s how you are. God was there like the birds and the wind.”

“I think the best evenings are when we have messages, things that make us think, but we can also laugh and enjoy each other’s company.”

“In what terms should we think of these beings, nonhuman yet possessing so very many human-like characteristics? How should we treat them? Surely we should treat them with the same
consideration and kindness as we show to other humans; and as we recognize human rights, so too should we recognize the rights of the great apes? Yes.”

“Is it not possible that the chimpanzees are responding to some feeling like awe? A feeling generated by the mystery of water; water that seems alive, always rushing past yet never going,
always the same yet ever different. Was it perhaps similar feelings of awe that gave rise to the first animistic religions, the worship of the elements and the mysteries of nature over which
there was no control? Only when our prehistoric ancestors developed language would it have been possible to discuss such internal feelings and create a shared religion.”

“It has actually been suggested that warfare may have been the principle evolutionary pressure that created the huge gap between the human brain and that of our closest living relatives, the
anthropoid apes. Whole groups of hominids with inferior brains could not win wars and were therefore exterminated.”

“It was because the chimps are so eye-catching, so like us and teach us so much that my work was recognised worldwide.”

“It was both fascinating and appalling to learn that chimpanzees were capable of hostile and territorial behavior that was not unlike certain forms of primitive human warfare.”

“Lasting change is a series of compromises. And compromise is all right, as long your values don’t change.”

“Most Africans don’t get to see these wild animals at all. Once they see and learn about them, they are much more likely to become involved in protecting the environment.”

“My mission is to create a world where we can live in harmony with nature.”

“Only if we understand can we care. Only if we care will we help. Only if we help shall they be saved.”

“Researchers find it very necessary to keep blinkers on. They don’t want to admit that the animals they are working with have feelings. They don’t want to admit that they might have minds
and personalities because that would make it quite difficult for them to do what they do; so we find that within the lab communities there is a very strong resistance among the researchers
to admitting that animals have minds, personalities and feelings.”

“So this is my effort to bring back the hope that we must have if we are to change direction. . . . I think to be fully human, we need to have meaning in our lives, and that’s what I am
trying to help these young people to find.”

“The greatest danger to our future is apathy.”

“The least I can do is speak out for those who cannot speak for themselves.”

“There are an awful lot of scientists today who believe that before very long we shall have unraveled all the secrets of the universe. There will be no puzzles anymore. To me it’d be really,
really tragic because I think one of the most exciting things is this feeling of mystery, feeling of awe, the feeling of looking at a little live thing and being amazed by it and how its
emerged through these hundreds of years of evolution and there it is and it is perfect and why.”

“Today it is generally accepted that although the earliest humans probably ate some meat, it was unlikely to have played a major role in their diet. Plants would have been a much more
important source of food.”

“War had always seemed to me to be a purely human behavior. Accounts of warlike behavior date back to the very first written records of human history; it seemed to be an almost universal
characteristic of human groups.”

“What makes us human, I think, is an ability to ask questions, a consequence of our sophisticated spoken language.”