16 Best Pericles Quotes

16 Best Pericles Quotes

by / Comments Off / 2222 View / Dec 30, 2014

Pericles was one of the most prominent and influential statesman in Greece during the Golden Age. He used his ideals to turn Athens into an empire. He also led his men into the first two years of the Peloponnesian war. He died in 429 BC in Athens.

“Although only a few may originate a policy, we are all able to judge it.”

“Freedom is the sure possession of those alone who have the courage to defend it.”

“Future ages will wonder at us, as the present age wonders at us now.”

“Having knowledge but lacking the power to express it clearly is no better than never having any ideas at all.”

“Instead of looking on discussion as a stumbling block in the way of action, we think it an indispensable preliminary to any wise action at all.”

“Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn’t mean politics won’t take an interest in you.”

“Nor is it any longer possible for you to give up this empire … Your empire is now like a tyranny: it may have been wrong to take it; it is certainly dangerous to let it go.”

“Our love of what is beautiful does not lead to extravagance; our love of the things of the mind does not make us soft. We regard wealth as something to be properly used, rather than as
something to boast about. As for poverty, no one need be ashamed to admit it, the real shame is in not taking practical measures to escape from it.”

“The greatest gift you can give another is the purity of your attention.”

“The whole Earth is the Sepulchre of famous men; and their story is not graven only on Stone over their native earth, but lives on far away, without visible symbol, woven into the stuff of
other men’s lives.”

“The whole earth is the tomb of heroic men and their story is not given only on stone over their clay but abides everywhere without visible symbol woven into the stuff of other mens lives.”

“Time is the wisest counselor of all”

“We cultivate refinement without extravagance and knowledge without effeminacy; wealth we employ more for use than for show, and place the real disgrace of poverty not in owning to the fact
but in declining the struggle against it. Our public men have, besides politics, their private affairs to attend to, and our ordinary citizens, though occupied with the pursuits of industry,
are still fair judges of public matters; for, unlike any other nation, regarding him who takes no part in these duties not as unambitious but as useless, we Athenians are able to judge at
all events if we cannot originate, and instead of looking on discussion as a stumbling-block in the way of action, we think it an indispensable preliminary to any wise action at all.”

“We do not need the praises of a Homer, or of anyone else whose words may delight us for the moment, but the estimation of facts will fall short of what is really true.”

“We do not say that a man who takes no interest in politics is a man who minds his own business; we say that he has no business here at all.”

“What you leave behind is not what is engraved on stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.”